All times in CET

08.00-08.45

Welcome and Registration 

08.45-09.00

WELCOME DAY 2

Moderator for the Day: Ali Aslan, International TV Presenter

Keynote Speeches (5-7 mins each)

  • Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Director-General, World Trade Organization (TBC) 
  • H.E., Ambassador Katharina Stasch, German Ambassador to the UN and other International Organizations 
  • H.E., Febrian Ruddyard, Ambassador, Indonesian Embassy 

09.00-09.15

FIRESIDE CHAT – THE GAP BETWEEN SCIENCE AND POLICY IN POST PANDEMIC RECOVERY? 

In Dialogue with: Stephen Twigg, Chair of Parliamentary Assembly Commonwealth & Soumya Swaminathan, Chief Scientist, WHO

09.30-10.45

PANEL 1: INNOVATION IN A DIGITAL AGE – A FUNDAMENTAL PILLAR TO STRENGTHEN THE GLOBAL HEALTH ARCHITECTURE 

Session Description: COVID-19 has highlighted the need of investing in digital health to leverage the response to this pandemic and prevent future health emergencies. Lack of harmonization, poor interoperability of data, lack of trust, inequities within and among countries, and weak infrastructures are just some of the current challenges that we have witnessed during the pandemic.

Several initiatives have been created to address those challenges, such as the Riyadh Declaration on Digital Health in August 2020 which provided recommendations for the global health community, the Digital Health Global Partnership Initiative, the Digital Health Taskforce endorsed by the Saudi Arabia G20 Presidency, the WHO’s “Global Strategy on Digital Health 2020-2025”, the “Principle for Donor Alignment in Digital Health”, Indonesia G20 Presidency proposal on digital transformation plus the several real-time data collection platforms that have been created during the pandemic.

This panel aims to discuss how we can leverage digital health in a post-pandemic era to promote a stronger global health architecture to create a global system that promotes equity, trust, better data sharing practices, validation of applications, such as vaccine passports across countries, to leave no one behind.

Keynote: Alain B. Labrique, Director Digital Health, WHO (5 minutes) 

ChairRajendra Pratap Gupta, Founder, Health Parliament, Digital Health Academy, Chairman – Dynamic Coalition on Digital Health (3 minutes) 

Panellists: (3 minutes for each panellist and question)

  • Lakshmi Balachandran, Senior Director, Digital Health, Clinton Health Access Initiative, Inc.
  • Annalisa Pawlowsky, Senior Research Scientist, Google
  • Giorgio Moretti, Founder & Chairman, Dedalus Group 
  • Tamer H. Farag, Health Partner Innovation, Meta
  • Omar Najim, Director, Executive Affairs Office, Abu Dhabi Department of Health

Q&A and Discussions (10 minutes)

Concluding Remarks: Bert Hartog, Senior Director, Clinical Innovation (Janssen R&D), Johnson & Johnson (3-5 minutes)

10.45-12.00

PANEL 2: WHAT ARE THE GLOBAL BEST PRACTICE INITIATIVES DEVELOPED IN G7, G20 AND BEYOND DURING THE PANDEMIC? HOW CAN WE MAKE THEM MORE SUSTAINABLE AND STRENGTHEN EFFICIENT MULTILATERAL AND CROSS-SECTORAL COOPERATION?

In Multi-Dialogue With: 

  • Saleh Al Ali, Executive Director, Emergency Centre, Department of Health Abu Dhabi  
  • Marie-Ange Saraka-Yao, Managing Director and Director of Resource Mobilization, private Sector Partnerships, Innovative Finance Department, Gavi
  • Thomas Cueni, Director General, IFPMA 
  • Janet Ginnard, Head of Strategy, Unitaid
  • Bill Rodriguez, CEO, FIND
  • Osamu Kunii, CEO and Executive Director, GHIT Fund
  • Johan Vekemans, Senior Science and Clinical Advisor, IAVI 

Session Description: In recent years multilateral organisations  have created a multitude of global health initiatives, such as the ACT-Accelerator, Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response (IPPPR), Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB), WHO Pandemic and Intelligence Hub, G7 Economic Resilience Panel, G20 Joint Health and Finance Taskforce and  G20 High Level Independent Panel for Financing the Global Commons for Pandemic Preparedness and Response (G20HLIP), the Pan-European Commission on Health and Sustainable Development amongst others. 

This panel aims to explore how these initiatives can be turned into concrete actions through the active engagement of both the public and the private sectors and build a safer

12.00-13.00

Lunch Break

13.00-14.00

OPENING AFTERNOON SESSION

PANEL 3: DELIVERY TO THE LAST MILE? – HOW CAN WE STRENGTHEN SUPPLY CHAINS AND SUPPORT MUTUAL RECOGNITION FOR INTERNATIONAL MANUFACTURING HUB & RESEARCH TO STRENGTHEN OUR GLOBAL HEALTH ARCHITECTURE?

Session Description: Supply chains are the cornerstone of robust health systems and must be resilient and responsive to reach the Last Mile. This, together with strengthening and building local manufacturing capacities is key to ensure we have a stronger global health system that can respond to health threats.

This panel aims to explore ideas on how supply chains and manufacturing capacities, especially in low- and middle-income countries, can be strengthened through a collaborative North-South approach to prevent, detect and respond to health threats.  This panel promotes a dialogue among preparedness and response authorities around the world.

Many unseen vulnerabilities and weaknesses were exposed in global supply chains by the coronavirus pandemic. In the face of new challenges and with potential emerging and re-emerging diseases, supply chain strengthening could not be a more important task.

There is a need to become more resilient, collaborative, and networked with suppliers, customers and stakeholders at a international, regional level and local level. Supply chains need to be more efficient, flexible, agile, resilient and digitally networked for optimal visibility

This complements local manufacture and a robust end to end chain. Unparallel supply chain disruptions and raw materials shortages could lead to an increase in counterfeit products, which pose a serious health risk.

Chair: Philippe Francois, Senior Vice President, Global Supply Chain, BD (3 min)

 Panellists: (3 minutes for each panellist and question)

  • Najat Mokhtar, Deputy Director General of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency
  • Pierre Delsaux, Director General, Directorate, Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Authority (DG HERA), European Commission
  • Etleva Kadilli, Director Supply Division, UNICEF 
  • David Reddy, CEO, Medicines for Malaria Venture
  • Sulaiman Saleh Al-Dakheel, General Manager, Gulf Health Council (GHC)- 
  • Petro Terblanche, Managing Director, Afrigen Biologics

14.00-14.30

FIRE-SIDE CHAT: THE TWO BIG KILLERS WORLDWIDE – CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES AND TUBERCULOSIS

In Multi-Dialogue with: 

  • Lord Nick Herbert of South Downs, Chair, Global TB Caucus 
  • Peter Krustrup, Professor of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark 
  • Lucica Ditiu, Executive Director of the Stop TB Partnership
  • Ricardo Baptista Leite, Founder and President, UNITE 

Session Description: Whereas the global attention has shifted toward the need to prepare the world for the next pandemic, there are still key global health priorities that need to be addressed. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is currently the leading cause of deaths worldwide with an estimated 17.9 million deaths per year (WHO), while infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis, (1.5 million deaths, WHO 2020), still remains the leading cause of death in low-income countries.

14.30-15.30

PANEL 4: WHY IS CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE THE No. 1 KILLER WORLDWIDE DESPITE BEING PREVENTABLE? 

Background: This panel will provide a brief overview of how cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are considered a ‘silent pandemic’ because often the people living with the deadly disease are unaware of it. 1 in 4 of us will die from heart disease and half of all deaths from heart disease are either sudden or unexpected. It is a population which remains largely overlooked.

The panel will focus on the prevalence of CVD in G20+ countries, sharing the latest report by Harvard and OECD outlining that 18.6 million died from CVDs globally in 2019. Cardiovascular diseases are also the most common cause of death in G20+ countries.

The panel will discuss why governments and patients have accepted this disease despite its exorbitant cost to our economies and societies?  How can we work better in partnerships top-down and bottom-up to overcome this challenge?

Chair: Rifat Atun, Professor Harvard University, School of Public Health (3 minutes)

Panellists: (3 minutes for each panellist and question)

  • Téa Collins, Lead, Global NCD Platform, Office of the Deputy Director-General, World Health Organization 
  • Kausik Ray, Professor of Public Health, Imperial College, London
  • Haseeb Ahmed, President, Novartis Europe 
  • Mathias Egermark, Senior VP, Cardiometabolic Disease Area Network, Roche Diagnostics  

Q&A and Discussions (15 minutes)

Concluding Remarks: Hasbullah Thabrany, Lead Co-Chair, T20 Global Health Security and COVID-19 Task Force; Former Dean of the School of Public Health, University of Indonesia

15.30-15.45

Coffee Break

15.45-17.00

PANEL 5: WHERE IS AMR WITHIN THE RESTRUCTURING OF THE GLOBAL HEALTH ARCHITECTURE? 

Background: AMR has been declared by WHO as one of the main global public health threats and since 2017 it reflects prominently on G20 agendas. AMR has a high economic and human costs and has the potential of a pandemic scale impact. AMR also has a negative impact in reversing the progress in diseases such as tuberculosis and malaria. Yet the actions needed to address AMR globally, from infection prevention to investment in new diagnostics and treatments, are the same solutions needed to address pandemic threats of unknown origin.

This session will discuss how efforts to build a resilient pandemic preparedness and response architecture can accelerate progress on strategies to combat AMR. Globally there is a need to improve awareness at all levels from healthcare professionals to patients in simpler and digestible language. 

By applying a more human-centric approach to tackling AMR we can help to increase understanding of antimicrobial resistance from a bottom-up approach. At the same time using a “One Health” approach we can advance multisectoral collaboration in tackling the issue. 

The lack of data in identifying causes of rise in AMR, proof a challenge to better detect and prevent these from emerging. 

Chair: Hanan Balkhy, Assistant Director General, Antimicrobial Resistance, WHO (5-7 minutes) 

Panellists: 

  • Adam Zerda, Senior Director, International Affairs, Becton Dickinson
  • Henry Skinner, CEO, AMR Action Fund   
  • Marc Gitzinger, CEO and Co-Founder, BioVersys
  • Kevin Outterson, Executive Director, Carb-X
  • Najat Mokhtar, Deputy Director General of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency

Q&A and Discussions (10 minutes)

Concluding Remarks

James Anderson, Executive Director, Global Health, IFPMA (3 minutes)

17.00-17.30

CONCLUDING REMARKS & OUTLOOK TO G20 HEALTH MINISTERS MEETING 

  • Alan Donnelly, Chair, The G20 Health and Development Partnership (Summit Host)
  • Hasbullah Thabrany, Lead Co-Chair, T20 Global Health Security and COVID-19 Task Force; Former Dean of the School of Public Health, University of Indonesia

17.30-19.30

Networking and Drinks

Location: The WHO Cafe